13 Responses to “Episode #100”

13 Comments

wow i just found that old half life movie (like 8 minutes long). it was the worst thing i’ve ever seen.

anyone read the first issue of the comic? i was surprised by how it was 40-something pages long. Most ambitious comic they’ve tried doing so far.

Why dosent steam popup with news telling me this is released on steam ?, how am i suppose to know if moddb didnt exist, more people would play mods if there is like a popup news telling us about new mods added to steam etc…

Great podcast all!

The impromptu interview with Mike raised an interesting question for me, now Ii dont knoe the history of Valve’s modding relations, but steamworks seems to be primarily Valve-centric. the only non HL mod on is defence alliance 2 as far as i know, do you think this is more a reflection of the community (more, better mods for source) or developer (getting permision from the unreal guys or what have you) or do you think Valve is/was using mods to help sell thier product? I know I got the orange box for Insurgency, I really didnt care about TF2 or the HL2 games, of course my views have changed since, but what do you think about the (seeming, i could be wrong…. again….) lack of other engine mods getting steamworks? And follow up- do you think mods help sell games?

- “but what do you think about the (seeming, i could be wrong…. again….) lack of other engine mods getting steamworks?”

I think it’s more about resources than anything else. It takes a lot of effort on Valve’s end to support mods (even for their own games).

- “And follow up- do you think mods help sell games?”

I’m sure there are at least a few people that bought a game just to play a mod, but compared to game sales, I’d guess that it’s still a relatively small number. For that reason and considering that supporting mods costs the developer time/resources (i.e. money), not every developer will want to support mods.

Those who do it right, however (i.e. Valve), definitely benefit from it. Look at Counter-Strike, Day of Defeat, the Team Fortress series, etc.. They all started off as mods for Half-Life 1 and turned into massive commercial successes.

That being said, even small mods add “value” to any game. Between all the Valve games I bought and all the Source mods I’ve downloaded, I’ve probably spent about 2000x more hours playing “something” on one of Valve’s games than every other game I own, combined. It’s getting more and more difficult for me to actually play anything else. It just doesn’t feel like.. “Source”. :)

Yea I have about 10 source mods I still need to play. It’s at the point now where other engines feel…. off? I know what you mean, lol

@ Overwatch 1.20 update: “one major update each month”. Damn, that’s tough.

@Dystopia: End of the line? Well, if you guys manage to clean up and update some sort of SDK, you can release that as well, and who knows, maybe people will produce content for it.

“The modding community is not what it used to be”. True. I believe that modders are shifting their goals, from modding to game making. Or getting married and having kids :P. Is it the lack of new modders that is worrying?
As for moddb, man … since Ryan left, it is a bit … dull.

– @Willianm: even ‘back in the day’ you had plenty of options to mod, not just GoldSource. You had the Quake engines, the LithTech engine (SHOGO, NOLF, heck, in 2001 AvP2). There were enough options with good enough SDKs.

It could be that this (let’s call it) “last” generation of modders is the last generation of people that didn’t take computers and games for granted, and this might be the difference. I mean even in this episode the guy from Dystopia made a very clear distinction: the “new modders”, represented here by the Eye of The Storm, who would rather switch for SC2 rather that work his way through the SDK, and the “old guard” (:P) represented here by Mike, who understood that nothing is free, and you need to put some (sometimes considerable) effort into getting your way.

Now, unfortunately, this extrapolates to almost everything. It’s a new mentality, where everything is taken for granted.

Z3RO Here from the Zombie Master 2 Development Team. I first wanna thank you guys for the plug. I’m gonna clear up some of the stuff you guys were talking about regarding to Zombie Master 2. Here’s a quote from Pi Mu Rho (One of the Original Zombie Master devs and Part of ZM2 Team)

“ZM2 is about as close to official as you’re ever going to get. Tannerbondy has the blessing of the original developers, I’m one of them (and I’m remaking the official maps) and we’re even going to be hosting the site in the same place.”

We want to keep the core ideals that made the original Zombie Master so much fun.